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Cat Vaccinations

Vaccination is the best way to protect your pet from serious infectious diseases. Most of the diseases we vaccinate against have no specific cure or where treatment is available it can be prolonged, costly and often unsuccessful.

Cat Vaccination Guidelines
Kittens require a series of vaccinations
Adult Cats

All adult cats require yearly booster vaccinations to ensure they maintain long term immunity.

Post Vaccination Care

Some cats may be off colour for a few days after vaccination and on rare occasions they may develop a slight swelling and pain around the injection site. Provide your pet with somewhere quiet, warm and comfortable to rest and sleep with access to food, water and a litter tray. Please contact the clinic if this continues for more than a few days or you are concerned.

All cats require vaccination against the following infectious diseases:

Feline Enteritis -Otherwise known as Feline Panleucopenia, this viral disease is very contagious and unfortunately the death rate is high, especially in cats under twelve months of age. Infected pregnant cats often lose their young or give birth to kittens with abnormalities. Symptoms include depression, loss of appetite, vomiting and diarrhoea often with blood and severe pain. The virus spreads very easily and cats that do recover from the disease continue to carry the virus and infect other cats for some time.

Feline Respiratory Disease -Otherwise known as Cat Flu, it is caused in 90% of cases by Feline Herpesvirus and/or feline Calicivirus. Feline Respiratory disease is highly contiguous and causes sneezing, coughing, runny eyes, nasal discharge, loss of appetite and tongue ulcers. The death rate is low except in young kittens, but the disease is distressing and often persists for several weeks. Recovered cats often carry and spread the infection for some time.

Chlamydia -Feline chlamydia causes a severe persistent conjunctivitis. Kittens are often more severely affected by chlamydia if infected with Cat flu.

Feline AIDS (FIV) –If your cat is an outdoor cat we recommend that they are vaccinated against FIV. Feline Aids is a disease caused by infection with feline immunodeficiency virus and affects the cat’s immune system. FIV is transmitted form bites from infected cats and it’s reported that between 14-29% of Australian cats test positive to the disease. Whist some cats show no sign of disease, some display symptoms such as fever, loss of appetite, diarrhoea, lethargy and swollen lymph nodes. As the disease progresses, the immune system becomes too weak to fight off other infections and diseases and as a result, infected cats often die from these subsequent infections.

Feline Leukaemia (FeLV) –This virus attacks the immune system and is transmitted from infected cats via mutual grooming, fighting, sneezing and even flea bites. Some cats may be infected and show no signs of the virus but others may display symptoms such as vomiting and diarrhoea, lack of appetite, weight loss and reproductive problems. Infected cats are also susceptible to other infections.

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